2022 Program

The 2022 Learning Institute Program will be updated frequently with more information ahead of the program in June. Please check this page frequently for the most up-to-date information . 

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2022

OPENING PLENARY- 10:00 a.m.- 11:00 a.m.

Dina Bell-Laroche

Our current culture is grief and mourning phobic, not inviting people to recognize, honour, and express their grief. As leaders and advocates for greater loss literacy, we meet people during life transitions and too often, they are encouraged to stay strong, be brave, and focus on the future, despite the grief many of them might be feeling after witnessing the death of someone they love or moving through various life transitions. The pandemic has created ambiguous losses for many people and without having the language to normalize our pain, many of us are part of the disenfranchised grievers. The result is increased anxiety, depression, exhaustion, and burn-out. Join Dina in this heart warming conversation about grief and hope as she traces her own journey through grief and shares what she has come to learn by re-imaging a new relationship with life losses.

 

Stream One- Equity Across Palliative Care

This stream focuses on areas that are integral to hospice palliative care: equity-informed care, trauma-informed care, cultural safety and humility, community engagement, advocacy and allyship. This session is presented at an intermediate to advanced learning level. 

Wednesday, June 22, 2022 – Session 1 11:15 a.m.

Equity Informed Care Panel – What does equity look like? 

An expert panel will present on issues of equity informed care through their unique contexts and perspectives. Areas of discussion include situating equity within an academic/western perspective, a community-based perspective, and an Indigenous perspective. Participants will be invited to ask questions and join the discussion. 

Learning Objectives: 

1. Examine what equity informed care is and how it impacts health systems

2. Discuss the roles and responsibilities of various practitioners and describe equity from their perspectives

3. Explore health challenges from an equity perspective at the end of life 

Faculty: 

  • Holly Prince, Project Manager, Lakehead University  
  • Arrow Bigsmoke, Indigenous Cancer Patient Navigator, Cancer Care Alberta 
  • Ashley Mollison, Project Coordinator, Equity in Palliative Approaches to Care  
  • Kelli Stajduhar, RN, PhD, Univeristy of Victoria 

Lunch Break 1:45 p.m.-2:45 p.m.

During the lunch break and throughout the program learners will be given the opportunity to review posters submitted by professionals in the field and attend the virtual exhibit hall where you they network with organizations and businesses in the sector.

Wednesday, June 22, 2022 – Session 2 – 2:45 p.m.

Equity- Oriented Palliative Care

The section consists of two sessions addressing key aspects of equity-oriented palliative care. 

Addressing the need for Culturally Safer Care 

  • Explore structural determinants of health 
  • Create a reflective space for healthcare providers to examine their positionality
  • Describe the importance of developing therapeutic relationships stemming from empathy and compassion 
  • Introduce the concepts of cultural safety, humility and trauma-informed care as ways to  challenge individuals, organizations and healthcare systems 
  • Discuss reconciliation and allyship as strength-based responses to move forward together

Engaging people and communities in inner city settings

  • Introduce the concepts of social and structural determinants of health and why they matter for palliative care
  • Describe why engaging people and communities is central to providing equitable care, and identify strategies for engagement
  • Explore opportunities to decrease barriers to care for people experiencing poverty, homelessness, and discrimination
  • Identify and discuss how to apply approaches to equitable care including trauma-informed care, relationship-centered care, harm reduction, etc.
Learning Objectives:
  1. Discuss equity and accessibility related to culturally safer care and examine the benefits of adopting a strength-based response
  2. Explore the social and structural determinants of health
  3. Introduce system approaches and innovative programs in trauma-informed care
  4. Examine the difference between relationship-centred care and patient-centred care
  5. Consider how issues of equity are communicated in the community and identify approaches of engagement.
Faculty: 
  • Holly Prince, Project Manager, Lakehead University  
  • Arrow Bigsmoke, Indigenous Cancer Patient Navigator, Cancer Care Alberta 
  • Ashley Mollison, Project Coordinator, Equity in Palliative Approaches to Care  

Thursday, June 23, 2022 – Session 3 – 10:00 a.m.

Advocacy and Accomplices

This session explores practical ways to advocate and support efforts of system changes for equity within programs and services. Participants will explore tools on how this can be done with advice on how to implement projects across the country. The role of how to make this work within a multidisciplinary team will also be examined and a discussion of the common challenges in making changes will be undertaken.

Learning Objectives: 

1. Examine tools for creating equity-based programs

2. Explore system changes and challenges in what is being done

3. Look at the role of a multidisciplinary team and how equity works for everyone

 

Faculty:

  • Holly Prince, Project Manager, Lakehead University  
  • Arrow Bigsmoke, Indigenous Cancer Patient Navigator, Cancer Care Alberta 
  • Ashley Mollison, Project Coordinator, Equity in Palliative Approaches to Care  
  • Dr. Danielle Petricone-Westwood, University of Calgary 

Stream Two: Re-Imagining Advance Care Planning Across Health Care

Wednesday, June 22, 2022 – Session 1 – 11:15 a.m.

Re-Imagining ACP Engagement in LTC: Starting with the Person

Using a case scenario, participants will critically reflect on what did not go well leading to a resident’s death in a LTC home. Through group discussions and interactive activities, participants will explore and identify tangible solutions that could have changed the outcome and become familiar with effective communication strategies to build collaboration and support care. Participants will also learn about ACP, the domains of issues tool, and how to take action to become actively involved in supporting resident wellbeing as part of an interdisciplinary approach to care. 

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Identify own strengths and develop areas for growth to support resident wellbeing as part of an interdisciplinary team.  
  2. Recognize when issues are not being address that affect resident wellbeing.  
  3. Demonstrate how to initiate effective communication techniques to engage residents and relay information to their team.  
  4. Identify support resources and professional development tools.  
Faculty:
  • Sharon Kaasalainen, Professor and Gladys Sharpe Chair in Nursing, McMaster University 
  • Tamara Sussman, PhD, Director, Social of Social Work, McGill University 
  • Bianca Tetrault, MSW, Research Coordinator 

Lunch Break 1:45 p.m.-2:45 p.m.

During the lunch break and throughout the program learners will be given the opportunity to review posters submitted by professionals in the field and attend the virtual exhibit hall where you they network with organizations and businesses in the sector.

ACP in Action

Wednesday, June 22, 2022 – Session 2 – 2:45 p.m.

Participants will explore barriers for Advance Care Planning (ACP) processes. Through interactive discussion and activities participants will be encouraged to reflect upon their own professional and/or personal barriers and think about system challenges to ACP engagement. Participants will consider person-centered/ ACP engagement as a protective factor to guard against moral distress. Lastly, participants will be encouraged to begin actively record their advance care planning thoughts as they are guided through a user friendly – easy read/plain language version of the My Voice in Action Workbook.   

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Critically reflect on personal, professional and systemic barriers to utilizing ACP in their practice settings 
  2. Strategize and consider potential solutions to address barriers 
  3. Identify a potential link between providing person-centered healthcare (via ACP) and moral distress.  4
  4. Actively engage in the 5 steps of ACP and record their ACP thoughts  
Faculty:
  • Cari Borenko, (BA BSW RSW MHS), Regional Lead, Advance Care Planning, Fraser Health Authority  
  • Sherry Faubert, Social Worker, Fraser Health Authority 

Thursday, June 23, 2022 – Session 3 – 10:00 a.m.

Working With and For Patients and Their Families: Moving Towards Solutions

The format of this session will be an interactive panel discussion, exploring interdisciplinary solutions on how ACP can be integrated in long-term care. Communication strategies across care team will be explored and how palliative care conferences can be used to foster stronger communication across interdisciplinary teams. Challenges within the sector will also be explored by panelists. 

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Learn to support interdisciplinary conversations using available tools
  2. Focus on experiential learning, get people thinking for themselves
  3. Teach participants to Highlighting connections throughout the journey – missed opportunities/points of action along the way for ACP

Stream Three: Grief and Bereavement... Is More Than Just Death

This stream will provide participants with a comprehensive understanding of grief and bereavement, alongside strategies and tactics that can be integrated into everyday practice.  Throughout the learning experience, there will be ample opportunities to pose questions and thoughts for discussion with fellow learners and educators. The stream also offers insights on how to approach conversations about grief with different populations, including children and adolescents, disenfranchised individuals, and fellow healthcare providers.  

  • This session is very interactive and experiential integrate in description 

Homework/Activity: Photo Voice 

Participants will be asked in advance to come prepared to share their reflections about their experiences of grief and bereavement. Participants will be asked to take a photo of something that shows an experience they have with grief and bereavement. Photos can be submitted in advance and will be made into a ‘mosaic’ slide and shared with participants. Speakers will share their experiences in grief and bereavement from their areas/lenses and will open the floor to discussion/sharing from participants. 

Wednesday, June 22, 2022 – Session 1 – 11:15 a.m.

Canadian Mosaic of Grief: Pulling the Pieces Apart

In this session, participants will be guided through how to identify and acknowledge grief in its many forms. An overview of approaching grief compassionately will be provided. This session will unpack some of the fears around grief and provide individuals to support themselves, patients and co-workers.   

Some of the key areas of focus are:  

  • Grief literacy  
  • Hidden grief  
  • Prolonged grief 
  • Disenfranchised grief 
  • Compassion and curiosity  

Learning Objectives: 

  • Learn to recognize various forms of grief 
  • Through group discussion reflect on how grief and bereavement can impact the provision of care  
  • Explore mechanisms and strategies to support people when working with bereaved individuals  
Faculty: 
  • Serena Lewis, Grief Specialist, Consultant  
  • Oceanna Hall, Spiritual Care and Mental Health Addiction Counsellor 
  • Katt Brooks, Recreational Therapist, Roger Neilson House 
  • Christopher Klinger, PhD, University of Toronto, National Institute for the Care of the Elderly, Pallium Canada, and Quality End-of-Life Care Coalition of Canada

Lunch Break 1:45 p.m.-2:45 p.m.

During the lunch break and throughout the program learners will be given the opportunity to review posters submitted by professionals in the field and attend the virtual exhibit hall where you they network with organizations and businesses in the sector.

Wednesday, June 22, 2022 – Session 2 – 2:45 p.m.

Grief The Silent Elephant in Every Room

During this session, participants will be given an overview of recently published research to help better contextualize grief into current structures and realities, particularly for people who were unable to say goodbye. During the latter half of this session learners will be invited to participate in two out of the three smaller learning groups: 

  1. Healthcare worker disenfranchised grief- addressing the toxic culture in the healthcare system, moral distress, often the elephant in the room, people asked to be professional and compassionate (conflicting messaging) Faculty: Oceanna Hall & Christopher Klinger
  2. Perinatal/ pediatrics, how to address grief for those who are pregnant and how to approach those conversations with children. Faculty: Katt Brooks
  3. Trauma-informed, who is impacted and how? Faculty: Serena Lewis

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Explore recently published research in the field and its complementary intervention strategies 
  2. In small groups learn how to engage with different populations while grieving–  based on interests and scope of work 

Faculty: 

  • Serena Lewis, Grief Specialist, Consultant  
  • Oceanna Hall, Spiritual Care and Mental Health Addiction Counsellor 
  • Katt Brooks, Recreational Therapist, Roger Neilson House 
  • Christopher Klinger, PhD, University of Toronto, National Institute for the Care of the Elderly, Pallium Canada, and Quality End-of-Life Care Coalition of Canada

Thursday, June 23, 2022 – Session 3 – 10:00 a.m.

The Mosaic of Compassion: Putting the Pieces Together

This session will open by inviting participants to share any insights or revelations from the previous day’s sessions. This session seeks to empower participants by providing them with the tools and resources to address grief in their everyday practice, including methods on how to improve communication skills. This session will host interactive components including large group discussions/ reflections and the viewing of a film on the experiences of young adults reflecting on their grief. 

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Learn interventions identified in newly published research
  2. Explore strategies to engage in effective communication
  3. Provide learners with resources that they can use to support their work and feel confident when engaging with bereaved individuals
  4. Identify the connection of compassion

Faculty: 

  • Oceanna Hall, Spiritual Care and Mental Health Addiction Counsellor 
  • Katt Brooks, Recreational Therapist, Roger Neilson House 
  • Christopher Klinger, PhD, University of Toronto, National Institute for the Care of the Elderly, Pallium Canada, and Quality End-of-Life Care Coalition of Canada

Stream Four: Compassionate and Competent Palliative Care for Specialist Palliative Care Nurses

Specialist palliative care nurses play an integral role within interprofessional teams providing compassionate and competent palliative care in Canada. This stream will equip participants with strategies for delivering complex symptom management, creating a strong palliative care team and providing trauma-informed care and culturally safer care to patients.

This stream has been developed for specialist palliative care nurses working in palliative care, or those who desire to learn more about complex nursing assessment and symptom management in palliative care, such as those working towards their CHPC(N) certification.

Wednesday, June 22, 2022 – Session 1 – 11:15 a.m.

Complex Symptom Management

 

This session will explore evidenced-based practices for delivering complex symptom management, building on existing and new approaches in care, including pain, delirium, and dyspnea.  Participants will be given the opportunity to unpack the challenges of delivering care through addressing the intricacies of nurse-to-family relations and how to navigate sensitivities and needs in practice. 

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Explore the role that specialist palliative care nurses play in symptom assessment and management for patients with complex palliative care needs and their families
  2. Understand how to navigate sensitivities while administering care in the realm of symptom management.
  3. Learners will be introduced to approaches to address complex pain.

Faculty: 

  • Dr Leonie Herx, MD, PhD, CCFP (PC), Associate Professor and Chair, Division of Palliative Medicine, Queens University; Past-President, Canadian Society of Palliative Care Physicians
  • Melissa Touw, Clinical Nurse Specialist Consultant, Queen’s University

Lunch Break 1:45 p.m.-2:45 p.m.

During the lunch break and throughout the program learners will be given the opportunity to review posters submitted by professionals in the field and attend the virtual exhibit hall where you they network with organizations and businesses in the sector.

Wednesday, June 22, 2022 – Session 2 – 2:45 p.m.

Models of Palliative Care and Teams/ Specialist Team Cultivation/Cultures of Practice

This session will equip participants with strategies to foster a strong, competent palliative care team, providing models and frameworks to guide team development and build capacity for an integrated program of specialist and primary palliative care. This session will include reflections on the roles of palliative care nurses within care team structures. Newly developed research on staffing models will be unpacked, exhibiting how palliative care programs can be implemented to meet the needs of a community. Educators will weave in interactive components to encourage reflections and discussion.  

Topics/ Models/ and Frameworks covered will include:  

  • Framework for Palliative Care in Canada  
  • Interdisciplinary Competency Framework for Palliative Care in Canada 
  • Staffing Model for Specialist Palliative Care Teams 

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Reflect on the role that specialist palliative care nurses play within palliative care teams  
  2. Explore how key national frameworks can guide and inform best practices 
  3. Learn about newly developed staffing models for specialist palliative care teams and complementary implementation strategies 

Faculty: 

    • Melissa Touw, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Queen’s University  
    • Dr Leonie Herx, MD, PhD, CCFP (PC), Associate Professor and Chair, Division of Palliative Medicine, Queens University; Past-President, Canadian Society of Palliative Care Physicians
    • Dr David Henderson, MD, CCFP(PC), Canadian Society of Palliative Care Physicians

Thursday, June 23, 2022 – Session 3 – 10:00 a.m.

Advance Palliative Approach- Just the tip of the iceberg: Trauma Informed/ Culturally Safe Practice in Palliative Care

This session will explore the importance of strengthening trauma-informed and culturally safer care.  Integrating these practices supports greater understanding of our own wellbeing, which optimizes the way we work with others.  Participants will engage with self-awareness, and an opportunity to reflect on current practice and growth potential.

Learning Objectives: 

  • Demonstrate the need and challenge of establishing an environment of safety (self & others)
  • Recognition of  trauma informed practice, psychological safety, grief literacy cultural safety & humility intersects  in context with our palliative approach to care
  • Explain how biases can influence the care we provide
  • Summarize the concepts and application to your practice.

Faculty: 

  • Serena Lewis, Grief Specialist, Consultant  
  • Nicole Wikjord, Clinical Nurse Specialist, First Nations Health Authority  

Stream Five: Psychosocial Care

This stream will be composed of intermediate to advanced interactive lectures, activities, and discussion groups. Over one and a half days, this stream will explore the issues around psychosocial care in a hospice palliative care environment, including conflict, caregiver support including lessons learned from Covid-19, and suffering. 

Wednesday, June 22, 2022 Session 1 11:15 a.m.

The 90-day Window: Changing Courses and Managing Suffering

In this session, participants will explore the role of social workers in managing suffering related to dying, including deaths by MAiD and suicide. Participants will hear a case study and will engage in exercises to understand the social worker’s role in managing suffering for patients, families, caregivers, and members of the interdisciplinary team. 

Some key areas of focus are: 

  • Bill-C7 modification of the law (MAiD) 
  • Role of the social worker in the 90-day intervention 
  • Clinical Impact including: 
  • Supporting the client and family in waiting and preparations 
  • An advanced study of suffering, including an interactive activity to understand suffering on a deeper level 
  • Suicidal screening 
  • Reflection on suffering and collective rituals 

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Learn about suffering and the role of the social worker in managing suffering related to death and dying 
  2. Examine the role interdisciplinary teams play in helping patients and families with suffering 
  3. Discuss the clinical impact suffering has on the social worker, families, caregivers, and other team members 
  4. Examine and discuss suffering and collective rituals used in managing loss  

Faculty: 

  • Patrick Durivage, Coordinator, Domain of Expertise in Palliative Care, CREGÉS 
  • Zelda Freitas, Adjunct Professor, School of Social Work, McGill University

Lunch Break 1:45 p.m.-2:45 p.m.

During the lunch break and throughout the program learners will be given the opportunity to review posters submitted by professionals in the field and attend the virtual exhibit hall where you they network with organizations and businesses in the sector.

Wednesday, June 22, 2022 – Session 2 – 2:45 p.m.

Addressing and Understanding Conflict

This session looks at conflict within the hospice palliative care setting. The session will explore the nature of conflict and how conflict impacts decision-making for care. Conflict amongst teams will also be examined as it relates to working as an interdisciplinary team to come up with best care practices for the patient. Participants will learn about how to develop strategies to work through conflict towards resolution. Additionally, conflict, as it relates to lessons learned from the pandemic, will also be touched upon. Participants will engage in an activity to help develop conflict resolution skills from a previously highlighted case study. 

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Identify conflict and causes of conflict for patients, caregivers, and team members 
  2. Explore ways to manage conflict through the development of strategies for managing conflict resolution 
  3. Learn about ways the Covid-19 pandemic impacted conflict within health settings. 

Faculty: 

    • Susan Blacker, Senior Director, Cancer and Palliative Program Planning and Performance, Sinai Health  

Thursday, June 23, 2022 – Session 3 – 10:00 a.m.

Caregivers Support

This session will be split into two parts. Part one will focus on caregivers in palliative care. The session will examine causes of stress, strain, and burdens and will recognize burnout. The session will focus on how to screen for unmet needs of the caregiver while discussing what supports are currently available. Additionally, this session will also examine evidence for interventions. Part two will focus on dementia and the challenges of integrating palliative care for dementia patients. This session will explore dementia at end-of-life, social worker interventions, and will discuss recognizing dementia as a care condition. 

Learning Objectives: 

  • Recognizing the signs of stress, strain, burden, and burnout for caregivers and the social workers role in supporting caregivers 
  • Examining dementia at the end of life and exploring social workers’ interventions for patients with dementia. 

Faculty: 

  • Zelda Freitas, Adjunct Professor, School of Social Work, McGill University

Closing Plenary

More information coming soon….